Wednesday, December 24, 2008

Researchers achieve new efficiency record of blue OLEDs

Researchers achieve new efficiency record of blue OLEDs

Ever since Sony's XEL-1 hit the market, pundits have pointed to the (comparatively) short-lived blue OLED material as its biggest hamstring. Researchers have been toiling around the clock in order to bring the blue lifepsan in line with its green and red siblings, and now it seems like a team of Gators are that much closer to the promise land. Reportedly, a gaggle of whiz-kids from the University of Florida have "achieved a new record in efficiency of blue organic light-emitting diodes, and because blue is essential to white light, the advance helps overcome a hurdle to lighting that is much more efficient than compact fluorescents." Franky So (pictured) and his diligent crew were able to reach a peak blue OLED efficiency of 50 lumens per watt, which is halfway to his goal of at least 100 lumens per watt. Hurry it up, folks -- CES is just around the corner.

[Via Physorg]

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Researchers achieve new efficiency record of blue OLEDs originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 23 Dec 2008 ! 15:55:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Friday, December 19, 2008

New Solar Balloon Creates 400 Times More Energy Than The Average Solar Cell

Source: http://www.causecast.org/news_items/7304-new-solar-balloon-creates-400-times-more-energy-than-the-average-solar-cell

coolearth-article.jpg

There are many new forms of alternative energy but maybe none as interesting as the Cool Earth Solar "Balloon." The concept behind this design is that they create an "inflatable plastic thin-film balloon (solar concentrator) that, upon inflation, focuses sunlight onto a photovoltaic cell held at its focal point.

The design produces 400 times the electricity that a solar cell would create without the company's concentrator." Cool Earth has already began construction on a power plant in Livermore, CA that will utilize this new technology. The plant is modest in size, creating only 1.4 Megawatts but if this plant works as well as they expect it to, they plan on launching a full sized plant next summer. One great thing about this device is that it's made up of a very common and cheap material. "Plastic thin film is abundant and cheap," said Cool Earth Solar CEO Rob Lamkin. "It only costs two dollars for the plastic material necessary for our solar concentrator."

It's ideas like this that I think will stick. It's cost efficient. It's made of an easy to find material and it's an environmentally sound concept.

Do you think this sounds like a good way to harness solar energy?

To read more environment-related news, please visit the Causecast Environment Page.

Photo: cleantechnica


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Chinese Car Maker Begins Selling the F3DM, the World's First Mass Produced, Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle [Hybrids]

Chinese Car Maker Begins Selling the F3DM, the World's First Mass Produced, Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle [Hybrids]

I never expected the world's first mass produced, plug-in hybrid car to pop up for sale in China, mecca of e-waste and air pollution. But BYD Auto did just that with the F3DM.

According to the Grist, the F3 Dual Mode began selling this week with a $22,000 price tag, aimed initially at the Chinese government agencies and other corporate entities. The hybrid plugs into any normal wall outlet, and has a range of 60 miles on a full charge. According to the New York Times, it charges fully in 7 hours, and at special stations, can be charged halfway in 10 minutes.Keeping in the spirit of a hybrid, it also has a 1.0 liter gas engine that is used to recharge the batteries when a power outlet isn't nearby.

While numerous other car makers have announced plans to sell a plug-in hybrid, none have actually brought one to market, with the nearest release date not until 2010. Worth noting is that BYD started in 1995 manufacturing cellphone batteries until they acquired a bankrupt auto company in 2003. Now they have Warren Buffet as a 10% shareholder in the company. [Grist via NYT]



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Thursday, December 11, 2008

MTI Micro shows off universal fuel cell charger with removable cartridge

MTI Micro shows off universal fuel cell charger with removable cartridge


As you may or may not have noticed, the folks at MTI Micro seem to be plenty convinced that fuel cells will eventually power all manner of devices, and they're now taking things one step further with their new Mobion universal fuel cell charger that, yes, promises to provide power to any device in the entire universe (with a USB port). To add a bit more practicality to the equation, the charger makes use of removable (and disposable) cartridges, which each provide 25 watt-hours of power, or roughly enough to fully charge the average cellphone more than ten times. While it's only in prototype form at the moment, the company says that the final product should be available by the end of 2009, although it's not making any promises about a price just yet.

[Via Planetary Gear]

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MTI Micro shows off universal fuel cell charger with removable cartridge originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 11 Dec 2008 01:03:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, December 3, 2008

IBM Predicts Solar Sidewalks in 5 Years

source: http://cleantechnica.com/2008/12/02/ibm-predict-solar-sidewalks-in-5-years/

thin film

According to IBM’s annual “Next Five in Five” report, thin-film solar cells will be embedded in driveways, sidewalks, paint, rooftop, and windows within 5 years.

The prediction is based on an expected drop in the price of thin-film solar cells, which are 100 times thinner than silicon solar cells.

Thin-film solar cells are already cheaper than silicon-wafer cells because of a production process that allows them to be printed and arranged on any flexible backing, including cell-phones, notebook computers, and clothing.

Other IBM predictions include digital shopping assistants, personalized genetic maps, and advances in voice recognition software.

Photo Credit: NREL

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