Thursday, March 26, 2009

Wireless water meters on the loose in New York City

Wireless water meters on the loose in New York City


On the environmental tip, Mayor Bloomberg has announced that New York City will install 826,000 wireless water meters by 2011. Under the new system, readings will be sent to a network of rooftop receivers throughout the city every six hours, enabling the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to bill property owners every month with exact water usage -- with the bill available online. Under the current system, water use is estimated and folks are billed every three months. The system will cost taxpayers $250 million, and installation (free for property owners) is already underway in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens. When it is fully installed, New York will be the largest city in the world to use wireless water metering. According to the New York Times, it's estimated that a 5 to 10 percent reduction in water use could save the city up to $90 million annually.

[Via Vos Iz Neias; Thanks, Yossi]

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Wireless water meters on the loose in New York City originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 25 Mar 2009 12:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Friday, March 20, 2009

Robotic Carp Unleashed Into the Sea to Sniff Out Pollution [FishBot]

Robotic Carp Unleashed Into the Sea to Sniff Out Pollution [FishBot]

Those crazy looking robotic carp now have a job-a whole school of them are going to be released into the sea off northern Spain to help detect hazardous pollutants in the water.

Created by engineers at the University of Essex, they measure about 8 feet long, can swim at roughly 2.24mph and feature real fish-like undulating action. Each fish has its own navigation system, so they can swim around the port without human control. When their batteries are running low, they return to dock at the charging station.

So what's the cost for these fishy pollution sniffers? About $30,000. Yeesh. Didn't anyone tell these guys that money doesn't grow on seas? [The Register via Crunchgear]



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Rumored Toyota Hybrid Sportscar is Prius-based [Cars]

Rumored Toyota Hybrid Sportscar is Prius-based [Cars]

The thing that's always kept me from wanting a hybrid car is that they aren't all that fast. And the ones that are fast cost too much money. That might change with Toyota's MR2 Hybrid.

The rumored MR2 Hybrid is said to be built around the Prius design, but would go 0-60 in under 7 seconds and come equipped with paddle shifters. Jalopnik thinks that the engine would be similar to the FT-HS's 3.5-liter, V6 Hybrized innards from a few of years ago. The price? Supposedly it's would only be around $24,000. I think I'm starting to get hot flashes. [Auto Express via Jalopnik]



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Thursday, March 19, 2009

Modistech unveils flexible, ultrathin OLED light in Korea

Modistech unveils flexible, ultrathin OLED light in Korea


We just heard that the OLED market was set to skyrocket in 2011, but don't tell Modistech. Said outfit has just revealed its own flexible, ultrathin OLED light module in South Korea, which honestly looks eerily similar to Samsung's "flapping" OLED panels from last fall. Details are pretty scant right now, but we're told to expect mass production within the next year, with public availability penciled in for -- you guessed it -- 2011. Hit the read link for a few more delightful looks.

[Via OLED-Display]

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Modistech unveils flexible, ultrathin OLED light in Korea originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 18 Mar 2009 20:14:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Super Thin, Flexible OLED Lights to be Available in 2011 [Oled]

Super Thin, Flexible OLED Lights to be Available in 2011 [Oled]

We've seen ultra-skinny flexible OLED sheets before, but it looks like we now have a date for when they're coming out. Korean company Modistech says it'll debut its thin-and-flexy OLED lights in 2011.

According to Aving.net, the company will begin mass production of the sheets later next year. Each sheet is expected to retail for $212. It's kind of expensive, especially if that price is just for the sheet in the picture, but that's par for the course with new tech – I'm just excited OLED sheets are finally stepping out of the research lab. [OLED Display]



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Sunday, March 15, 2009

EV-o RR Electric Motorcycle Can Kick Your Gas Guzzler's Butt [Motorcycles]

EV-o RR Electric Motorcycle Can Kick Your Gas Guzzler's Butt [Motorcycles]

In preparation for the zero-emissions grand prix, Evo Design Solutions has this fearsome electric superbike, fast enough and tough enough to challenge the old-school gas models.

Evo Design Solutions used a couple design tricks to allow room for the bike's large battery, including a monocoque that encloses the drivetrain, which negates the need for a frame. Bikes in this category easily break the 4-second mark in a 0-60mph, so these aren't electric toys. As for this particular model, it'll be sold for less than 20,000 pounds (about $28,000 USD), and there are no immediate plans for mass production, though that may change if it's a big hit. Mostly, we're just impressed with how pretty it is. Just look at it! [Wired]



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Monday, March 9, 2009

Philips Master LED light bulb set for US release in July

Philips Master LED light bulb set for US release in July


Philips has been hitting us with some out-there lighting concepts lately, but the company's Master LED light bulb is actually already on sale in Europe and is set to brighten up Stateside lives around July. The 40W-equivalent bulbs should run between $50 and $70, and expected lifetime is set at 45,000 hours -- just slightly more than a CFL's 10,000 or a standard bulb's 750 hours. The Master is certainly a damn sight nicer looking than the other mutant LED bulbs we've seen, but we'll see if consumers are ready to jump on another more-expensive-upfront lighting tech so soon after CFLs have hit the mainstream.

[Via Core77]

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Philips Master LED light bulb set for US release in July originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 09 Mar 2009 21:03:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Oyster Wave Energy Converter puts climate change to good use

Oyster Wave Energy Converter puts climate change to good use


One of the Holy Grails of green power is hydroelectricity, and we've certainly seen our fair share of research in that department. The newest guy on the scene is called Oyster, a collaborative effort between Queen's University in Belfast and Aquamarine Power Limited that sees something called an Oscillating Wave Surge Converter placed offshore (in depths around 10-12 meters). When moved by waves, the device's double acting pistons push seawater ashore via high pressure flow lines, where it is converted to power using tried and true hydroelectric generators. Since the hydroelectric plant is located onshore, it is accessible for maintenance 24-7. According to the company, peak power should be around 300-600 kw, depending on the unit's configuration and location. The first prototype is to be deployed off the coast of Orkney this summer, where we'll see if it can transform high tides and abnormal weather patterns into juice for your Xbox. One more pic for you after the break.

[Via Renewable Energy World]

Continue reading Oyster Wave Energy Converter puts climate change to good use

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Oyster Wave Energy Converter puts climate change to good use originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 09 Mar 2009 10:49:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of! feeds.

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Oyster Wave Energy Converter puts climate change to good use

Oyster Wave Energy Converter puts climate change to good use


One of the Holy Grails of green power is hydroelectricity, and we've certainly seen our fair share of research in that department. The newest guy on the scene is called Oyster, a collaborative effort between Queen's University in Belfast and Aquamarine Power Limited that sees something called an Oscillating Wave Surge Converter placed offshore (in depths around 10-12 meters). When moved by waves, the device's double acting pistons push seawater ashore via high pressure flow lines, where it is converted to power using tried and true hydroelectric generators. Since the hydroelectric plant is located onshore, it is accessible for maintenance 24-7. According to the company, peak power should be around 300-600 kw, depending on the unit's configuration and location. The first prototype is to be deployed off the coast of Orkney this summer, where we'll see if it can transform high tides and abnormal weather patterns into juice for your Xbox. One more pic for you after the break.

[Via Renewable Energy World]

Continue reading Oyster Wave Energy Converter puts climate change to good use

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Oyster Wave Energy Converter puts climate change to good use originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 09 Mar 2009 10:49:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of! feeds.

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