Friday, April 24, 2009

Eizo's FlexScan Monitors Activate On a Motion Sensor [Displays]

Eizo's FlexScan Monitors Activate On a Motion Sensor [Displays]

Here is a good, green idea—monitors that activate or deactivate based on the presence of humans. That is exactly how Eizo's 20-inch FlexScan EV2023W-H and the 23-inch EV2303W-T help to save energy.

The built-in motion sensor on the monitor will switch to standby mode when the presence of a human is not detected for 40 seconds. Outside of that, both are a pretty standard monitors with 1600 × 900 native resolution, 178-degree viewing angles, and a 3000:1 contrast ratio for the EV2023W and 1920 × 1080 native resolution, 160-degree viewing angles, and a 1000:1 contrast ratio for the EV2303W. Both versions will be available starting on May 21, 2009 for approximately $385 and $455 respectively. [TechOn via FarEastGizmos]



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Thursday, April 23, 2009

Eizo's FlexScan EV2023W / EV2303W LCD monitors turn off when humans are away

Eizo's FlexScan EV2023W / EV2303W LCD monitors turn off when humans are away


Not that we haven't seen LCD monitors get less demanding when it comes to energy, but we've yet to see a company take eco-friendliness this far. Professional LCD maker Eizo has just announced a new pair of panels (the 20-inch FlexScan EV2023W-H and the 23-inch EV2303W-T) that boast a "human presence sensor." As the phrase implies, these displays are designed to shift to power saving mode when it realizes that its master has vacated the area, and when they return, it automatically flips back on in order to keep from being bashed by one of many USB-connected peripherals. Unfortunately, it seems the human detection timer can't be changed from 40 seconds, and no, there are no current plans to implement a robot presence sensor once the Apocalypse is realized.

[Via FarEastGizmos]

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Eizo's FlexScan EV2023W / EV2303W LCD monitors turn off when humans are away originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 23 Apr 2009 14:17:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, April 15, 2009

California May Get Some Power From Solar Space Cells By 2016 [Solar Power]

California May Get Some Power From Solar Space Cells By 2016 [Solar Power]

The idea of harnessing solar power from space has been around for a while; Asimov included it in at least two of his stories that I remember—but may finally be a reality come 2016.

PG&E, the state's largest power utility (and the one who gets my money every month), just signed a deal to get solar space power from Solaren.

The plan is to have solar panels collect the energy in space, shoot it down via RF transmissions, and convert that into usable electricity.

There's no risk to PG&E because they're not investing anything into the company, just agreeing to buy power at a certain rate if the space power does come through by 2016. [MSNBC]



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Monday, April 6, 2009

Mini Hydro Turbine concept could bring renewable energy production to your bathroom

Mini Hydro Turbine concept could bring renewable energy production to your bathroom

Mini Hydro Turbine concept could bring renewable energy production to your bathroom
Environmentalists would have you believe that leaving the faucet running while you brush your teeth puts an unnecessary drain on the environment. We always disagreed, and if Jin Woo Han's concept Mini Hydro Turbine ever goes into production we might finally have something to back up our argument. The device would capture the "free" energy of your tap to spin a little generator, in theory producing enough juice to charge up an electric toothbrush or shaver. That actually sounds somewhat reasonable, but Han's suggestion of powering your boiler with this thing is probably a bit optimistic. It would also take quite an optimist to think this could some day appear in a bathroom made of tiles and not pixels, but we'll keep on hoping; pairing this with a turbine toilet might enable us to take our homes completely off the grid -- or our bathrooms at least.

[Via Gadget Lab]

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Mini Hydro Turbine concept could bring renewable energy production to your bathroom originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 06 Apr 2009 08:13:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Friday, April 3, 2009

50W equiv. indoor lights from water and plastic water bottles

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Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Aqua, Hydra or Simply Water; It Needs To Be Clean

Aqua, Hydra or Simply Water; It Needs To Be Clean

I don't think I need to highlight the importance of clean drinking water to you elite crowd, but it is a major issue in many developing countries and war-torn zones. When designer Martin Bolton conducted a survey of the potable water that most rural houses in South Africa used, he was appalled at the quality and decided to do something about it. He devised an ingenious Potpaz Ceramic Filter system that is aimed at being a low cost water treatment device optimally suited to South African rural conditions.

Trying to keep the authenticity of the explanation of its working, here is what Martin has to say about the filter's working:

Operation of the filter unit

The ceramic filter element is filled with water to be filtered, the water then saturates the ceramic filter element and slowly filters through the pores at a rate of between 1.5 to 2.5 liters per hour, provided the filter is kept full (as stated on the leaflet received from the existing filter element manufacturers). The filter needs the weight of the unfiltered water in the element to create sufficient pressure to push the water through the pores. The water filtering through the filter element drips into the receptacle where it is stored, ready for consumption. Users' tap water from the plastic spigot attached through the receptacle wall. The covering lid prevents insects and dust from getting into contact with the filter element.

It has been shown that the filter element is able to improve the health related microbial quality of the water by means of the action of filtration. Effectiveness of the filter element, with regards to disinfection, can be increased with the application of colloidal silver to the filter element.
Colloidal silver is an effective antibacterial water treating agent in the form of tiny silver particles suspended in liquid. It is a disinfectant that prevents bacterial growth in the ceramic filter and assists in inactivating the bacteria in the filter. It is applied to the Potpaz filter in the form of a painted-on solution, or by dipping (after the firing process) thereby allowing the solution to soak into the porous ceramic filter where it remains. A study indicates that after 15 years in operation, the colloidal silver is still effective in the ceramic filter. The only routine maintenance of the filter components is as follows: The filter element needs to be scrubbed and rinsed once the flow-rate decreases considerably (possible once a month), and the inside of the receptacle needs to be cleaned with soap and water once a month.

Designer: Martin Bolton

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