Friday, June 26, 2009

Philips debuts PowerSensor-equipped Brilliance monitor

Philips debuts PowerSensor-equipped Brilliance monitor


Energy-saving monitors are hardly anything new, but Philips has taken things a bit farther than most with its new 22-inch Brilliance LCD, which packs a built-in infrared "PowerSensor" that can detect when someone's sitting in front of it. If it finds that it's been left by its lonesome, it'll dial down the brightness and cut power consumption by 50% -- all of which operates independently from the PC, so there's no compatibility issues to worry about. As a monitor, however, things are a bit less exciting, with it boasting a 1,680 x 1,050 resolution, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a 5ms response time, and the usual VGA and DVI inputs. No word on a release 'round here just yet, but it looks like folks in the UK will be able to pick this one up next month for £170, or about $280.

[Via Pocket-lint]

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Philips debuts PowerSensor-equipped Brilliance monitor originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 26 Jun 2009 15:11:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Orange's Solar Concept Tent has lots of revolutionary, imaginary features

Orange's Solar Concept Tent has lots of revolutionary, imaginary features


If the promise of Birkenstock-powered phone chargin' wasn't enough to get your ass to Glasto this year (never mind catching Björn Again perform ABBA's greatest hits on the Pyramid Stage), how about an up-close-and-personal peek at Orange's Solar Concept Tent? Designed with help from an American firm called Kaleidoscope, this guy is a refresh of the original Orange Solar Tent you might remember from 2003. Featuring photovoltaic fabric panels up top, an LCD display for keeping an eye on battery levels, a wireless charging pouch (like Palm's Touchstone but, you know, a pouch), a heating element embedded in the tent's groundsheet, the ability to light up if you should get lost while freaky dancing, and WiFi connectivity, this bad boy could conceivably get even the most nature-phobic Engadget editor out into the wild. That is, if it wasn't just a concept.



[Via Textually]

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Orange's Solar Concept Tent has lots of revolutionary, imaginary features originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 26 Jun 2009 03:33:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, June 23, 2009

The Car That Hangs Outta Your Window

The Car That Hangs Outta Your Window

Picture this: you walk into this hub hanging outta your high-rise apartment and then it gently glides down to the ground level. Touch ground and it transforms into this ultimate car that looks and feels SEXY! This IS the Peugeot Metromorph and it transports you thru the city with ease. I dunno about your hometown, but where I live, I got to pay premium rent for parking my car in my apartment building. This kinda concept looks at eliminating parking woes. Hit the jump to see how this beauty soars.

There are some specific features that have been attributed to the Metromorph, to make it a viable concept:

Drivetrain- the vehicle is powered by two in wheel motors placed in the back. There are two battery cases on the back as well.

Interior- the seats are held by rotating arms which keep the seat level when the vehicle goes vertical or horizontal. When the vehicle is a balcony the seats are placed on a rolling base which enables them to become lounge chairs thus freeing up the interior of the car to make it a balcony. The interior is also left fairly hollow to accommodate the balcony mode.

Exterior- the car is designed to not look like a car vertically mounted to a building and still look like a vehicle when it's on the road. So the wheels are concealed toward the inside. Rather than go vertically like many scissor doors today Metromorphs' arms rotate closely around the vehicle allowing the doors to freely open in a cramped area like a garage.

A Car Elevator!

Designer: Roman Mistiuk

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Peugeot Metromorph Concept Car by Roman Mistiuk

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Friday, June 19, 2009

Wireless Resonating Power from Intel Research [Wireless]

Wireless Resonating Power from Intel Research [Wireless]

Intel researchers are working on wireless power that doesn't use a conductive pad. Instead, it uses magnets and a tuned directional transfer coil to send music from an iPod a couple of feet to a speaker. It works!

This setup is deceptively simple. There's an electro-magnetized ring of wire sending 1-watt signal at 7.6-something MHz. From there, a carefully placed and wound coil of wire (yellow) sends the magnetic signal in a direction where another smaller coil (green) specifically tuned to receive the power and send it to a tiny speaker. It reminds me of the way a generator or motor work, somehow. The range was about 3 feet and the music was quiet by audible and worked when I moved the speaker in different directions. Impressive!

The chances of this making its way into mobile gadgets that charge with no cables or pads, ever? We're far off. The range and power are dependent on the size of the coils and the exact way they are wound, so they resonate the magnetic signals just right. Maybe a micro array of these, optimized several generations from now, will do the trick.

Or maybe the Dharma institute already has the answers.




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Wednesday, June 17, 2009

RF Cochlea Is a Super-Powered Signal Processor Modeled After the Inner Ear [Future Tech]

RF Cochlea Is a Super-Powered Signal Processor Modeled After the Inner Ear [Future Tech]

RF signal processors are pretty commonplace in consumer electronics. Which is exactly why it's exciting that two MIT researchers have created a super-radio based around the function of the human ear that's substantially faster and 100x more power efficient than today's signal processors.

The inner ear is able to take in all the noise in a surrounding area, and adapt how it processes the sound accordingly. Gizmag says that in a similar fashion, the RF Cochlea is able to analyze a wide range of frequencies, and maximize how it routes data for maximum bandwidth and minimal power consumption. In testing, these designs have been faster than anything they've ever seen before.

What this means for the rest of us is the development of faster, smarter radios for signals such as television channels, cellphones, wi-fi, etc... These "smart radios" could not only take unused bandwidth from one application and put it to work in another, but they could also learn to avoid certain frequencies based on the radio waves in their current location. The end result would be stronger, clearer wireless signals.

The researchers also think it would be possible to commercialize this technology within a couple of years, if someone was so motivated. I like that. [Gizmag]




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Monday, June 15, 2009

First Hybrid Solar Power Plant is a Jack Of All Trades [Solar]

First Hybrid Solar Power Plant is a Jack Of All Trades [Solar]

A new solar power plant is set to open its doors on June 24th in Kibbutz Samar, Israel—but this is a one of a kind complex thanks to a hybrid-microturbine.

The plant can generate 100 kW of on-demand power and 170 kW of thermal power and consists of 30 mirrors that concentrate the sun's rays to the 30-foot Aora Tower. The rays are used to heat concentrated air to drive an electric turbine and the microturbine kicks in at night to fill in the gaps. It is capable of running on biodiesel or natural gas, which means power 24-hours a day—rain or shine. Because it is so versatile, this technology could help power up off the grid communities without having to expand existing grids. Aora is already looking to expand into other countries—and I say bring it on. That tower reminds me of the Eye of Sauron—only more flower-y. [Aora Solar and Treehugger via Inhabitat]




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Saturday, June 13, 2009

Neighborhood Fruit Helps You Share Your Garden's Bounty [Eat To Live]

Neighborhood Fruit Helps You Share Your Garden's Bounty [Eat To Live]

Free community web site Neighborhood Fruit helps green thumbs swap the excess food from their garden with other locals in their community.

Neighborhood Fruit was founded to cut down on wasted produce. If you're sharing produce, you can register what kind of trees, bushes, or vegetables you've got growing, and people can search out and find you for trades and purchases. In turn, you can search the area around your home to find other home owners looking to share their unused fruits and vegetables, and also find fruit-bearing trees on public land.

For another resource to help you find fruit on public land, check out the previously posted Fallen Fruit. Not sure visiting your neighbors' yards for your produce fix is your thing? Find a farmer's market for some farm fresh and delicious produce.



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XERO Project Green Building Concept: Veggie Does Dallas [Architecture]

XERO Project Green Building Concept: Veggie Does Dallas [Architecture]

Somewhat like a vegetarian version of the Dragonfly building in Manhattan, the XERO Project is a proposed idea of bringing local agriculture, orchards, gardens and food stalls into the city of Dallas, all under one roof.

Don't put those BBQ ribs down quite yet—Texans can breathe a sigh of relief as this project is still only a concept, which was first submitted to the Vision Dallas design competition looking to make Dallas a greener city. [Archinect]




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