Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Paper mulches evaluated for commercial vegetable production

Paper mulches evaluated for commercial vegetable production

Polyethylene mulches, used widely in commercial vegetable production to improve crop yields and produce quality, have distinct disadvantages. Disposal options are limited, and plastic mulches often end up in landfills, being burned, or disposed of illegally. Recycling polyethylene mulches is also a challenge; the mulches used in large-scale vegetable production are contaminated with too much dirt and debris to be recycled directly from the field in most power plants and incinerators. Timothy Coolong from the University of Kentucky's Department of Horticulture published a report on paper mulches in HortTechnology that may give vegetable producers viable alternatives to polyethylene.

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Monday, December 27, 2010

Nissan Leaf rates you against other drivers, creates a high score list for hypermilers

Nissan Leaf rates you against other drivers, creates a high score list for hypermilers

Nissan Leaf rates you against other drivers, creates a high score list for hypermilers
Xbox Live and the Achievement system kind of reinvented the high score list, letting you compete against your friends even when you're roaming solo through a stark, barren wasteland. It looks like Nissan is doing much the same with the Leaf -- but minus the bloatflies and the supermutants. As the cars are now rolling out to eager owners we're learning more about just what its Carwings system can do and another neat trick is the "Regional Rankings" page, where one driver's driving efficiency is rated against others in the area. There are bronze, silver, and gold medals up for grabs but, if you cover the thing with speed tape and only commute downhill, you might just be awarded the platinum award. What does that get you? Why, a little picture of a trophy, of course. What were you expecting?

Nissan Leaf rates you against other drivers, creates a high score list for hypermilers originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 26 Dec 2010 15:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Monday, December 20, 2010

Create Energy Stepping

Create Energy Stepping

This fancy little object goes by the name “Slide” and with it, you can generate energy walking up and down steps. By simply placing your hand upon the green and pushing it along the railing aside the stairs you’re walking on, you’ll generate energy! With that energy, the several arrohead-shaped LEDs in the object are lit so that you might see where you’re going in a power outage or other emergency situation!

So simple! Watch this design spread across the internet now – the most virally ready designs are the same ones that follow the Pop Art jealous critic manifesto: “I could have thought of that” “Yeah, but you didn’t!” Well played, trio of designers.

This project is a 2010 LiteOn design award winenr!

Designers: ShuoYang, Bolong Huang and Qiao Yang

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Yanko Design
Timeless Designs - Explore wonderful concepts from around the world!
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IIDA Entry Makes Fresh Water

IIDA Entry Makes Fresh Water

C-Water is one of those concepts that’s too good of an idea not to share. An entry in the Incheon International Design Awards, C-Water boasts water purification possibilities using a simple distillation technique. The power source? The sun. The slim, yet stackable object can float on any calm water surface. Fresh water gets collected in a separate reservoir and the whole thing is compact enough to go portable. Looks like Designboom is spreading the word too.

Designer: Chao Gao

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Yanko Design
Timeless Designs - Explore wonderful concepts from around the world!
Yanko Design Store - We are about more than just concepts. See what's hot at the YD Store!

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Inhabitat's Week in Green: electric cars compared, molten salt solar, and a renewable Merry Christmas!

Inhabitat's Week in Green: electric cars compared, molten salt solar, and a renewable Merry Christmas!

Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green.

Electric vehicles took the country by storm this week as both the Nissan Leaf and the Chevy Volt were officially released to eager customers - if you're still trying to decide between the two, check out our electric vehicle smackdown, which compares the two EVs based on their most important features. We also took a spin inside Honda's electric Fit, and we showcased a futuristic home decked out with enough solar panels to completely charge an EV. The Sonex airplane also signaled bright horizons for electric aviation as it completed its maiden flight.

Meanwhile California lit up the newswires by giving the green light for the state's first molten salt solar energy project, and San Francisco announced a plan to generate 100% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020. We also saw ten European countries forge a plan to build a massive renewable energy supergrid in the North Sea, and we showcased two hot examples of wearable teach that harness body heat - Fujitsu's solar-thermal power band and a band-aid styled mp3 player.

Finally, this week Inhabitat geared up for the holidays by showcasing 6 brands of dazzling LED christmas lights that save you energy and money, we showcased some innovative Christmas trees made with unusual materials, and we highlighted out favorite green gadget gifts for the holidays this year. And when all those presents are unwrapped we know exactly what to do with the aftermath - researchers have developed a way to recycle 100% of the material in plastic wrapping paper and artist Jason Rogenes wowed us with his incredible futuristic spaceships made from the styrofoam used to package electronics.

Inhabitat's Week in Green: electric cars compared, molten salt solar, and a renewable Merry Christmas! originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 19 Dec 2010 22:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Thursday, December 2, 2010

Vatican Praises Genetically Modified Crops, While U.S. Judge Orders Their Destruction

Vatican Praises Genetically Modified Crops, While U.S. Judge Orders Their Destruction

It's been a strange few days in the world of genetically modified food. For the first time, a judge has ordered the destruction of a GMO crop, saying it was planted in violation of a previous ruling. Meanwhile, Vatican science advisers are urging support for GMO crops, saying scientists have a moral duty to help the world's poor.

On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White ordered the removal of genetically modified sugar beet stecklings from hundreds of acres of farm fields, saying the U.S. Department of Agriculture improperly gave permission for their planting. Sugar beet stecklings are planted in the fall, uprooted during the winter, and replanted to produce seed.

Last fall, White ruled the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) had violated the National Environmental Policy Act by allowing the plantings without analyzing their potential impacts on the environment and human health. This August, he said no more GMO beets could be planted until a NEPA review was done. But some stecklings were still planted in Arizona and Oregon, prompting the environmental law group Earthjustice and the Center for Food Safety to file suit in September. White's latest ruling answers that lawsuit and orders the GMO stecklings to be removed from the ground.

In 2010, 95 percent of the nation's sugar beets were genetically modified to tolerate glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup weed killer developed by St. Louis-based Monsanto Co. Half the nation's sugar comes from sugar beets, which are sliced and boiled into a syrupy mash. In January 2008, public interest groups sued to challenge the USDA's deregulation of the crop, starting a cascade of legal action that led to Tuesday's ruling.

Environmental groups note that the proliferation of herbicide-resistant plants has led to superweeds, that the use of chemicals can pollute land and water and that genetically modified crops have not been sufficiently studied. But Monsanto and other GM food advocates argue "Roundup Ready" beets and other crops allow farmers to avoid tilling their land to remove weeds, and that genetic modification in general can improve crop yields and provide tolerance to pests and drought.

The Vatican is apparently on their side. In a statement (PDF) this week, Vatican science advisers said opposition to GM crops in developed countries is unjustified. The Pontifical Academy expressed provisional support for GM crops 10 years ago, and the statement is the result of a week-long meeting in May 2009 at the Vatican, convened by a Swiss scientist who helped develop vitamin A-enhanced golden rice.

Academy member Peter Raven, immediate past president of the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis (which has received funds from hometown firm Monsanto), told New Scientist although the global community will never have a unified official line on GM crops, "Our statement is about as close as you can get to one."

The 14-page document makes the case for GM crops as a way to feed the world, and says it's no more dangerous than evolution:

"The possible evolutionary risks of genetic engineering events cannot be greater than the risks of the natural process of biological evolution or of the application of chemical mutagenesis."

The academy even tackles the question of whether scientists are "playing God" by messing with nature, and the answer is no: "New human forms of intervention in the natural world should not be seen as contrary to the natural law that God has given to the Creation."

Vatican law or American law, this debate is far from over.

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Strawberry-Pickin' Robot Only Picks the Red Berries [Video]

Strawberry-Pickin' Robot Only Picks the Red Berries [Video]

Strawberry-Pickin' Robot Only Picks the Red BerriesYet another field of expertise has been wiped out by some steel pincers—strawberry-pickers. Japan's robot detects which berries are at least 80 per cent red, and picks them gently off the vine.

It's being trained to pick other forms of berries, but if the 'bot gets to the point where it can be released safely into the wilds of strawberry farms, it'll supposedly reduce harvest time by 40 per cent. That means fewer jobs for humans, and even more 'bots handling our sweet little bombs of juice. The future is definitely mechanical—and doomed. [DigInfo via Technabob]

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Wednesday, December 1, 2010

NRG and SunPower partner on 250-megawatt solar plant, plan to power 100,000 California homes

NRG and SunPower partner on 250-megawatt solar plant, plan to power 100,000 California homes

NRG Solar (get it?) and SunPower -- neither of which are strangers to extracting juice from that glowing ball of fire in our sky -- have just linked up to build one of the world's largest photovoltaic solar plants. The tandem will start construction in San Luis Obispo County next year, creating around 350 jobs in the process and helping California inch ever closer to realizing its 33 percent renewable portfolio standard. The 250-megawatt plant still pales in comparison to a few others (namely this guy in Arizona), but it dwarfs the vast majority of factories in operation today. The project is expected to stretch out for three or four years, but when all is said and done, around 100,000 homes (yeah, even the home of one Vincent Chase) will be given sun-sourced energy thanks to this here installation. That said, the actual energy bills for Californians everywhere probably won't sink -- but hey, at least you're throwing Ma Earth a well-deserved bone, right?

Continue reading NRG and SunPower partner on 250-megawatt solar plant, plan to power 100,000 California homes

NRG and SunPower partner on 250-megawatt solar plant, plan to power 100,000 California homes originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Dec 2010 09:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Study: Ecological effects of biodiversity loss underestimated

Study: Ecological effects of biodiversity loss underestimated

Children aren't the only youngsters who are picky eaters: More than half of all species are believed to change their diets -- sometimes more than once -- between birth and adulthood. And a new study by ecologists at Rice University and the University of California, Santa Barbara, finds this pattern has major implications for the survival of threatened species and the stability of natural ecosystems.

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New record achieved with Konarka's Power Plastic photovoltaic material with 8.3% efficiency certification

New record achieved with Konarka's Power Plastic photovoltaic material with 8.3% efficiency certification

National Energy Renewable Laboratory (NERL) has announced Konarka Technologies' organic-based photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells have demonstrated the highest performance for an organic photovoltaic cell at a record-breaking efficiency of 8.3%. This unprecedented certification is up from previously produced cells at 6% just two short years ago.

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Monday, November 15, 2010

For The First Time, Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Are Released Into The Wild

For The First Time, Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Are Released Into The Wild

The transgenic animals are designed to help stamp out dengue fever in the Cayman Islands

An Oxford-based research firm has announced the results of a release of genetically modified male mosquitoes in the Cayman Islands, the first experiment with GM mosquitoes to take place in the wild.

From May to October of this year, Oxitec released male mosquitoes three times a week in a 40-acre area. The mosquitoes had been genetically modified to be sterile, so that when they mated with the indigenous female mosquitoes there would be no offspring, and the population would shrink.

Mosquito numbers in the region had dropped 80 percent by August, which the researchers expect would result in fewer dengue cases.

Since it's only females who bite humans and transmit diseases like the untreatable dengue fever this study examined, British biologists suspected that introducing males sterilized by a genetic mutation into the gene pool could dramatically decrease their numbers over time.

While many scientists and environmentalists object to killing off mosquitoes entirely for fear it would harm dependent species, Oxitec asserts that, since the sterilizing gene could not be passed on to subsequent generations, this method will have no permanent ecological impact.

Rather, GM males function like an insecticide, temporarily reducing numbers without the negative effects of using chemical toxins. They can also be more effective against insects that had developed resistance to certain commonly-used pesticides. In regions where booming mosquito populations are have caused epidemic outbreaks of dengue fever, yellow fever and malaria, dramatically reducing the population temporarily could reduce the death toll, and provide valuable lead time to vaccinate and treat hard-hit populations.

As the death toll caused by disease-carrying mosquitoes rises (over 2 million of the 700 million people infected by mosquitoes die annually), science has proposed a wide range of possible solutions to lessen the damage, from lasers to chemicals. But the release of transgenic animals into the wild is a very bold new step.

[AP]

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Baking soda dramatically boosts oil production in algae

Baking soda dramatically boosts oil production in algae

Montana State University researchers have discovered that baking soda can dramatically increase algae's production of the key oil precursors for biodiesel.

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Plans for a domed city in a kilometer-wide Siberian diamond mine [Madurbanism]

Plans for a domed city in a kilometer-wide Siberian diamond mine [Madurbanism]

Here are plans for Eco-City 2020, a 100,000-person domed city built in the kilometer-deep and 550-meter-wide Mir diamond mine in the Yakutia Republic. According to designers AB Elise, the mine will be powered by the Siberian sun.

Here's a description of AB Elise's plan from Evolo:

The new city is planned to be divided in 3 main levels with a vertical farm, forests, residences, and recreational areas. On of the most interesting aspects of the proposal is the glass dome that will protect the city and would be covered by photovoltaic cells that will harvest enough solar energy for the new development.

According to Russian news, this project is more speculation than reality, but it certainly provides for some gee-whiz visuals.

[AB Elise via Evolo.us and Metkere]

Plans for a domed city in a kilometer-wide Siberian diamond mine
Plans for a domed city in a kilometer-wide Siberian diamond mine
Plans for a domed city in a kilometer-wide Siberian diamond mine
Plans for a domed city in a kilometer-wide Siberian diamond mine
Plans for a domed city in a kilometer-wide Siberian diamond mine
Plans for a domed city in a kilometer-wide Siberian diamond mine

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Friday, November 12, 2010

Chinese Build 15-Story Hotel In Just Six Days, Rest On Seventh [Video]

Chinese Build 15-Story Hotel In Just Six Days, Rest On Seventh [Video]

Six days. That's how long it took to build this level 9 Earthquake-resistant, sound-proofed, thermal-insulated 15-story hotel in Changsha, complete with everything, from the cabling to three-pane windows. The foundations were already built, but it's just impressive.

The wonders of prefabricated construction modules and modern construction techniques will never cease to amaze me. I just can't understand why every single building is not pre-made in factories first, for optimal energy, material and time savings, not to talk about a more efficient and cheaper end result and, in the case of the Ark Hotel, only 1% construction waste. [Archdaily]

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Thursday, November 11, 2010

Trees Infused With Glowing Nanoparticles Could Replace Streetlights

Trees Infused With Glowing Nanoparticles Could Replace Streetlights

Taiwanese researchers have come up with the elegant idea of replacing streetlights with trees, by implanting their leaves with gold nanoparticles. This causes the leaves to give off a red glow, lighting the road for passersby without the need for electric power. This ingenious triple threat of an idea could simultaneously reduce carbon emissions, cut electricity costs and reduce light pollution, without sacrificing the safety that streetlights bring.

As many good things do, this discovery came about by accident when the researchers were trying to create lighting as efficient as LEDs without using the toxic, expensive phosphor powder that LEDs rely on. The gold nanoparticles, shaped like sea urchins, put into the leaves of Bacopa caroliniana plants cause chlorophyll to produce the reddish luminescence.

In an added bonus, the luminescence will cause the leaves' chloroplasts to photosynthesize, which will result in more carbon being captured from the air while the streets are lit. The next steps are to improve the efficiency of the bioluminescence and apply the technology to other biomolecules.

[Inhabitat]

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Sweeping Report Details the Devastation of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna

Sweeping Report Details the Devastation of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna

Tuna at the Tsukiji Market John Mahoney

Environmental groups and wildlife conservation advocates have argued for years that Atlantic bluefin tuna populations are being devastated, but it was difficult to make a hard case. Why? The very people and authorities that should've been keeping track of fishing quotas and enforcing international regulations simply - and sometimes willfully - did not, leading to ongoing overfishing and keeping black markets stocked with product that is very difficult to trace back to the source. Now a group of investigative journalists have compiled their own detailed and damning report, as well as a companion documentary, tallying the damage done.

The report, compiled by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), details the abuses carried out in the harvesting of Atlantic bluefin tuna, a marine delicacy that can grow to more than 1,000 pounds and live for up to 40 years - and fetch up to $100,000 per specimen at auction in Tokyo (Japan makes up 80 percent of the bluefin market). The report reveals an intricate web of interests ranging from government agencies down to fishermen and fish markets all willfully ignoring the rules for the sake of profit.

To quote directly from the report:

The questionable practices extend across the industry, ICIJ found, from fishing fleets and farms, through ministry offices, to distributors in Japan. Led by the French, Spanish, and Italians, joined by Turks and others, Mediterranean fishermen violated official quotas at will and engaged in an array of illegal practices: misreporting catch size, hiring banned spotter planes, catching undersized fish, and plundering tuna from North African waters where EU inspectors are refused entry. An illicit market even arose in trading quotas - when regulators finally started enforcing the rules - in which one vessel sells its nation's quota to a foreign vessel that had overfished.

These illicit practices, the report claims, extend to sea ranching, in which fish are kept in a series of underwater cages and nets, fattened up like cattle, and sold off at auction. Because ranching fish creates a problem for fisherman looking to appear under quota, they quickly figured out how to use the ranches to "launder fish," falsifying fish counts and the weights of their catches. Barring that, a robust black market arose in loosely regulated places like Turkey and Tunisia, who would take un-counted, illegal fish off ranchers' hands.

The documentary filmmaker, Television for the Environment, is affiliated - albeit loosely - with wildlife groups like the WWF and the UN's Environment Program, so there are lingering questions of objectivity regarding the doc. But the report is worth perusing if for no other reason than to remind us of the relevance of that Socratic adage (paraphrased here): "who will police the police?"

Check out a teaser for the documentary below.


[ICIJ via New York Times]

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Monday, November 8, 2010

BP Oil Spill Aftermath: Dead Coral Found Near Spill Site [Oilspill]

BP Oil Spill Aftermath: Dead Coral Found Near Spill Site [Oilspill]

BP Oil Spill Aftermath: Dead Coral Found Near Spill SiteScientists have found dead and dying coral reefs 4,500 feet deep in the Gulf of Mexico. The dead coral means that oil from the BP oil spill is harming marine life in the deep ocean too.

When 5 million barrels of oil spill into the ocean, something bad was obviously going to happen. However, no one really knew how deep the oil would penetrate and how much damage it could cause.

The scientists do need further tests to prove that these dead coral reefs are directly related to the BP Oil Spill but given the evidence—proximity to the BP Oil Spill (7 miles southwest), the previous presence of oil plumes and the matter of which the coral reefs died—the scientists believe there's a pretty strong link. According to Charles Fisher, chief scientist on the gulf expedition:

Oil seeps naturally from the seafloor throughout the Gulf of Mexico, but that was unlikely to have caused such a severe coral die-off, he added. "We have never seen anything like this at any of the deep coral sites that we've been to," Dr. Fisher said. "And we've been to quite a lot of them."

Looks like the after-aftereffects of the Oil Spill are trickling in. [NY Times]

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Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Powercast and Microchip fire up interest at a distance with wireless power development kit

Powercast and Microchip fire up interest at a distance with wireless power development kit

We're sure if you asked Powercast nicely it'd tell you a whale of a tale, about how the "more than 100 companies" who allegedly signed up to develop products that seemingly pull energy from the ether materialized into this light-up Christmas tree. Still, we'd be happy to forgive and forget if meaningful products emerged instead, and that's why we're moderately happy the company's announced a nice big development kit. $1,250 buys your firm or deep-pocketed hobbyist the spread pictured above, with a wireless transmitter to throw three watts and a pair of receiver boards to catch them from over 40 feet away, plus a low-power development board from Microchip equipped with that company's proprietary short-range wireless protocols and ZigBee functionality. We can't wait to see what people build, but we won't be snapping one up ourselves -- we're still holding out for the firm to go open-source and build an Arduino version. PR after the break.

Continue reading Powercast and Microchip fire up interest at a distance with wireless power development kit

Powercast and Microchip fire up interest at a distance with wireless power development kit originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 27 Oct 2010 09:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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23-Year-Old's Solar Powered Fridge Earns Her Award From Nobel Prize Winners [Inventions]

23-Year-Old's Solar Powered Fridge Earns Her Award From Nobel Prize Winners23-year-old Emily Cummins started her career as an inventor as a young girl tinkering in her grandfather's shed. Now, thanks to a solar-powered fridge that's already in use across Africa, Nobel winners are handing her awards.

Cummins had the idea for the refrigerator last year when she was a student at Leeds University. A metal cylinder is placed inside a larger cylinder made of wood or cardboard. The space in-between the two is filled with a material that can be soaked in water, like soil or cloth, and as the sun heats that material and the water evaporates, it pulls the heat off the inner cylinder. Perishables can be kept at a cool 6 degrees C with no power needed whatsoever. It's already being used in Namibia, South Africa, Zambia, Botswana and Zimbabwe.
23-Year-Old's Solar Powered Fridge Earns Her Award From Nobel Prize Winners
Cummins was selected as a Oslo Business for Peace Honouree in Norway last week, a prestigious award established last year for ethical businesspeople which is overseen by a panel of Nobel prize winners. Not many people have talked to a Nobel prize winner, much less been bestowed with an award by one. Next month, in Japan, the Junior Chamber International will name her one of the Ten Outstanding Young Persons of the World for this year. And it's all because of a clever idea she had for a refrigerator.
"Hopefully these awards will inspire other young people to think about how they can contribute to our global community in a positive way," said Cummins. I have a feeling we'll be hearing about her own contributions again in the future. [DailyMail]

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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Nissan Leaf launches in Europe, takes us for a drive

Nissan Leaf launches in Europe, takes us for a drive

26,000 people can't be wrong, right? That's the current tally of Leaf pre-orders that Nissan has collected from US and Japanese drivers excited by its all-electric hatchback. Yesterday, the car that's built to plug into the same wall outlet as your toaster held its official pan-European launch party -- with the UK, Ireland, Netherlands, and Portugal getting the first deliveries in early 2011 -- and we were on site to grab a few closeup pictures and some precious time in the driver's seat. American drivers should look out for a new set of keys in their mailbox this December, so there's probably no better time than now to give them a preview of what they're getting themselves into. Jump past the break for more on the Nissan Leaf.

Continue reading Nissan Leaf launches in Europe, takes us for a drive

Nissan Leaf launches in Europe, takes us for a drive originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 07:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Thursday, October 7, 2010

Artificial Clouds That Could Stop Climate Change Receive Investment From Bill Gates

SOURCE: http://gizmodo.com/5536139/artificial-clouds-that-could-stop-climate-change-receive-investment-from-bill-gates


Artificial Clouds That Could Stop Climate Change Receive Investment From Bill GatesRather than plunge money in a couple of girlfriends his daughter's age, Bill Gates' retirement money sure is being put to good use, with his most recent investment being in machines that turn seawater into climate-changing artificial clouds.

His $300,000 will hopefully go a long way in Silver Lining's project, potentially knockingclimate change on its head if the machines can actually produce these artificial clouds. The machines work by sucking up seawater in vast quantities (ten tons a second), turning the water into minute particles that are then flown through the air some 3,000 feet high. High enough to increase cloud density, Silver Lining is hoping.

The project will begin with just 10 ships covering 3,800 square miles of sea, and if it's successful Silver Lining will have to start hitting up more tech company founders as it'd take 1,900 ships and a further $7 billion to actually stop climate change for good.

How about that Steve Jobs, Silver Lining? He's worth a few bob, isn't he? [The Times viaInhabitat via Slashdot]

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Thursday, September 30, 2010

Jaguar C-X75 is the 780bhp electric supercar we've all been waiting for, likely to keep us waiting (video)

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2010/09/29/jaguar-c-x75-is-the-780bhp-electric-supercar-weve-all-been-wait/

Ouch! It really stings to see the curvaceous spectacles that car designers can come up with, only to then find out the resulting electric speedsters are either far too expensive or nowhere near becoming a reality. Latest in this group of four-wheeled objects of desire is Jaguar's C-X75, which roars from 0 to 60mph in 3.4 seconds, cranks out 780bhp courtesy of a quartet of electric motors and a pair of micro gas turbines, and reaches a screaming 205mph at its absolute zenith. You can go for 68 miles just on electric juice or 560 if you let the gasworks recharge the Li-ion battery pack on the go. So it's gorgeous inside and out, it comes with swan doors, high-res LCD screens and an aluminum body, and it has less chance of being on sale than a dodo sandwich. Yep, it's an electric supercar alright. See the C-X75 on video after the break.

Continue reading Jaguar C-X75 is the 780bhp electric supercar we've all been waiting for, likely to keep us waiting (video)

Jaguar C-X75 is the 780bhp electric supercar we've all been waiting for, likely to keep us waiting (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 29 Sep 2010 20:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Kia Pop recharges in 6 hours with 87mph top speed and 100-mile range

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2010/09/30/kia-pop-recharges-in-6-hours-with-87-mph-top-speed-and-100-mile/

After an August tease the all-electric Kia Pop concept car is now getting a proper reveal at the Paris Motor Show. Pop is a three-meter long three seater featuring a number of futuristic touches like rear-view cameras in each door, a full length glass roof, and an otherwise transparent OLED panel that displays all your instrument readouts only when the car is running. A second touch panel to the right of the steering wheel controls the vehicle's other functions including audio, sat-nav, and climate. Under the hood you'll find a 60-ps, 190-Nm motor powered by lithium polymer gel batteries capable of charging in just six hours. Combined we're looking at an 87mph (140kph) top speed and 100-mile (160-km) max range. Of course, knowing the auto industry, by the time it hits the assembly lines it'll likely resemble an unimaginative shoebox using whatever off-the-shelf parts Kia can find. But a boy can dream can't he?

Continue reading Kia Pop recharges in 6 hours with 87mph top speed and 100-mile range

Kia Pop recharges in 6 hours with 87mph top speed and 100-mile range originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 30 Sep 2010 05:11:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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